Injured workers need intensive help to RTW says SA study

A South Australian study (2011) has found that long-term injured workers are more likely to return to the workforce with “intensive support”. SA Unions said on the release of the study report: “We have long argued that injured workers aren’t getting the support they need to retrain, to upgrade their skills and move industries if their injury prevents them from doing the job they used to do.

Injured workers need intensive help to RTW says SA study

Under the SA Unions project,  which was funded by the WorkCover SA Return to Work Fund, rehabilitation consultants and other experts worked closely with 50 injured workers – some of whom had been receiving WorkCover payments for more than two years – for 12 months.

The study shows that nine of the workers subsequently returned to paid employment, and four returned to their old workplaces on restricted duties. Thirty-five of the workers were able to undertake training programs.

“We have long argued that injured workers aren’t getting the support they need to retrain, to upgrade their skills and move industries if their injury prevents them from doing the job they used to do,” SA Unions secretary Janet Giles said on the release of the study report.

 

“This project shows [what] is possible, with some fantastic results for injured South Australians”, with “intensive support”.

 

 

Shortlink: http://wp.me/p1MA9G-2yd

 

3 Responses to “Injured workers need intensive help to RTW says SA study”

  1. We have received a number of interesting emails from genuinely SA injured workers re our above article.One of them stands out and we believe it is worth sharing:

    ” I was 4 weeks post surgery when my Casemanager asked me to do the program. I told them about how I felt my employer was partially the cause of my injury due to bullying etc; the anxiety came out on their reports but not the cause. I was always a little suspicious of this program. I felt as if I was a Guinea pig for something but could not figure it out. Stats were important to them. They would call me if I was late or had a day off. Support was minimal to non existent. I was constantly reporting the bullying and my anxiety with returning to work They were not genuine.

    Another one:

    “We were told the Abilita course was for long term pain management. Like ok….. I [was] very post surgical when I was forced to do the course.”

    It does appear indeed that the stats were more important than anything else and again it shows that as soon as “workcover funding” is inter-mingled, an objective “course” is just not possible – think along the lines of a highly biased rehab service provider hired by your insurance company… that does not cut off the hand that feeds it…

    workcovervictim June 30, 2012 at 4:36 pm
  2. I’m not convinced that these return to work program’s do much. For a program to be affective it needs the co operation of the employer, rehab worker and employee. Too bad if your boss is trying encourage you to leave. In the early part of my RTW program I was encouraged to do a program very much like this. A brilliant program! When I returned to work my employer didn’t uphold the same vision the program was attempting to achieve. They had no idea of the course I had just completed. Therefore a very good course was rendered useless.

  3. Forcing seriously injured workers back to work by cutting off their “benefits” is just not a solution. Most of those poor sods will, like me, re-injured themselves, terribly aggravate their injuries until they end up on the scrap heap with total permanent disability.